Causes of Overactive Bladder & Treatment Options

What causes overactive bladder? an overactive bladder is where an involuntary loss of urine that occurs when a person has a strong, sudden need to urinate. A more clinical term is “Urge Incontinence.”  The sudden involuntary loss of urine can be embarrassing sometimes inciting a pervasive fear of judgement by others limiting activity. In addition, even without big pharma it is expensive. The true total annual cost per woman for incontinence is over $2,000 for laundry, dry cleaning, damage to clothes and furniture.

Urge incontinence is not a consequence of aging, a disease, nor is it life-threatening. Scientific studies indicate women from college age (particularly athletes in high impact sports), through their 30’s to women 54 years and older, experience occasional to frequent urine leakage & Rather, it is a sign that there is an underlying problem of urinary incontinence among women. There are a number of overactive bladder treatments and some with excellent outcome capabilities.  Understanding the causes of for overactive bladder and the outcomes of the treatments will help you determine the best solution.

Causes of Overactive Bladder

The muscles of the pelvic floor hold and directly support a woman’s organs including the bladder, uterus, bowel and intestines. If the muscles of the pelvic floor weaken and can no longer hold the organs in their natural postural position, the organs shift, which places pressure on the bladder and results in what is commonly known as stress urinary incontinence – peeing when you cough or laugh can cause this.  In addition, muscle tone – for good or bad – affects continence by responding to intra-abdominal (urinary) cues. Atrophied muscles can contract spasmodically (meaning cramp up) causing urge incontinence.  Urge incontinence is not caused from your bladder jumping around asking to get off the bus! The detrusor is the bladder muscle which, can contract inciting the feeling of having to go. In fact, for decades, bladder problems were identified as incontinence or “detrusor instability.”

Mixed incontinence happens when the patient has both urge and stress urinary incontinence. Mixed incontinence is common and can result from abdominal surgery.

Right: Strong pelvic floor muscles and the organs laying on it Left: Weak pelvic floor muscles with organs stacking | © BCR 2016 |

Right: Strong pelvic floor muscles and the organs laying on it Left: Weak pelvic floor muscles with organs stacking | © BCR 2016 |

The Choice is Yours, Treat the Problem or Treat the Solution.

The medical profession most often addresses the problem of Female Urinary Incontinence with three principal solutions: medications, surgery and exercise (Kegels) to improve pelvic floor muscle tone. Until the Yarlap, predominant self-care has been absorbent pads, scheduled toilette visits and double voiding (urinating twice in a few minutes to more completely empty the bladder). 

Absorbent Pads:

The US adult diaper market is $14.2 billion. Annually, an incontinent woman will spend at least $750 on diapers. This number is based on five diapers a day. You should be changing your diapers as often as you can to avoid irritation. Laundry detergent is a support system of absorbent pads so that is even more money spent on a product that doesn't solve your urinary incontinence problem.

Medications:

medication-pills-bladder-incontinence.jpg

There are a number of medications available by prescription to treat causes of urinary incontinence. Perhaps the most persuasive case for medications, comes from Amir Qaseem, vice president of clinical policy at the American College of Physicians: “It’s easier to prescribe medications than to explain the non-pharmacological treatments.”  Yet, according to the Washington Post, in spite of all the promotional resources, half the women prescribed drugs for overactive bladder stop taking the medication within six month because the side effects include dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, dizziness and may be linked to dementia. Medications should always be used under the careful supervision.  Consumer Reports says, “Non drug strategies such as Kegel exercises and bladder training can work as well as medication without the risk of side effects.”

Pelvic Floor Exercise Therapies:

It is a popular, but not inaccurate, perception to associate pelvic floor muscle tone with sexual performance, particularly in women.  The muscles that spasmodically contract in orgasm are those same pelvic floor muscles. Dr. Kegel notes “sexual feeling within the vagina is closely related to muscle tone, and can be improved through muscle education and resistance exercise.”  Exercise therapy to tone and re-educate the pelvic floor muscles is an essential aspect of post-partum care in Europe.  “Essentially, you go for your six-week visit and if you have healed adequately, they give you your referral for the ‘reeducation,’” Dr. Dana Gossett, an OB-GYN and professor with the University of California San Francisco’s Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences told The Huffington Post. “It usually starts in the first couple of months, and it involves Kegel exercises ― that you do with a coach.”

Unfortunately, a significant number of women who try to tone their pelvic floor muscles with Kegel exercises find it difficult to determine if their pelvic muscle exercises have been performed correctly. As with any exercise, the benefit gained from the exercise is significantly diminished if the Kegel exercise protocol is poorly executed.  Some devices, like biofeedback devices alone, may not be appropriate for women who do not have adequate pelvic floor muscle control.

Using Biofeedback Devices Correctly For Overactive Bladder Treatment

When we exercise, our mind sends a mild electrical impulse to our muscles through our nervous system telling muscles when to contract and when to relax (work/rest). Biofeedback monitors the muscles’ contraction(s) only.  If you are contracting the wrong muscles for Kegels, like those in your bottom or abdomen, the biofeedback device reports the wrong musculature activity.  It is a clinically proven fact that a significant number of women who try to tone their pelvic floor muscles with Kegel exercises find it difficult to determine if their pelvic muscle exercises have been performed correctly. 

Since, biofeedback records muscle activity only, the time and effort spent following your muscle activity on a biofeedback device can be a virtual waste of your time. This is particularly true if the woman seeking pelvic floor muscle re-education has difficulty knowing and voluntarily commanding her pelvic floor contractions. Also, transmitting data or third party personal data storage introduces unnecessary risk and vaginally inserted batteries have additional areas of risk that should be carefully considered by the user as well. Luckily, electro-stimulation works the pelvic floor muscles correctly and conveniently, and the Yarlap® can be used to re-educate muscle performance.

Yarlap The Fast and Easy Overactive Bladder Treatment!

For women of all ages (and sizes) the Yarlap® has clinically proven programs for that “in and up feeling” for effective muscle tone. Plus, the Yarlap® has three pre-set clinically proven programs for pelvic floor muscle massage. The Yarlap® is FDA Cleared for OTC purchase direct from the manufacturer and for use in the privacy of your own home.  Yarlap® is a device that cures the root problem of urinary incontinence in women, with it's easy configurations, and plans to follow it will be your last stop for finding the real overactive bladder treatment.

Pelvic Floor Exercise Therapies: Control, Wellbeing & Empowerment

Now, here is an interesting twist to the non-invasive non-pharmaceutical treatment of pelvic floor muscle atrophy. The muscle contraction-release sequence in the orgasm is primarily of the pelvic floor muscles. So for women, the orgasm may be considered exercise.  It is the most personal of all exercises, critical to post-partum perineal re-education, fundamental to orgasmic intensity and integral to the woman as a nurturer.

New indications in a British peer review medical journal suggest, orgasm may be nature’s incentive to achieve pelvic floor muscle tone for many purposes, not necessarily reproductive, “The role of pelvic floor muscles in female orgasmic response,” perhaps for pain management. These many positive outcomes of pelvic floor muscle tone are important to the well-being of all women regardless of age or fecundity and may explain why the ability and drive to orgasm remains past menopause.

Treat your muscles. Treat your incontinence. Treat yourself. Yarlap®

Plus, treating the cause with the Yarlap® is far cheaper than treating the symptoms and the little luxuries that seem to have become necessities:

  • Half the true cost of a gym membership per year.
  • Less than half of six month on the average SmartPhone plan.
  • Less than half the annual cost of a coffee house visit.
  • Less than the annual cost to feed your puppy.
  • Less than half a family spends on soft drinks annually.


Sources:

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2593129/
 Prevalence of Incontinence Among Older Americans, June 2014
Schettino, M.T., Mainini, G., Ercoland, S., et al. (2014). “Risk of pelvic floor dysfunctions in young athletes.” Clinical & Experimental Obstetric & Gynecology 41, no: 671-676.
U.S. National Library of Medicine (2016). Stress urinary incontinence: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia.
U.S. National Library of Medicine (2016). Urge incontinence: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia.
http://www.culrav.org/pr/global-diapers-market-will-reach-usd-63-2-billion-by-2017

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2593129/
http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2016/11/complications-arise-mesh-used-pelvic-surgeries
Bo, Berghmans, et al (2007) Evidenced based physical therapy for the pelvic floor. Elsevier, Ltd. Philadelphia, p375
Pearson, C., What the French get so right about taking care of new moms. Hint: it involves something called “perineal re-education. The Huffington Post. Jan 17, 2017.
Bump, R.C., Hurt, W.G., Fantl, J.A., et al. (1991). Assessment of Kegel pelvic muscle exercise performance after brief verbal instruction. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 165, Issue 2, 322-329.
Bump, R.C., Hurt, W.G., Fantl, J.A., et al. (1991). Assessment of Kegel pelvic muscle exercise performance after brief verbal instruction. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 165, Issue 2, 322-329.

Hern, A. Vibrator maker ordered to pay out C$4m for tracking users' sexual activity. The Guardian. March 14, 2017.
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